Seminars this semester


   Series:


Sep 19 Tue Elizabeth Winstanley (Sheffield) Cosmology, Relativity and Gravitation
15:00 J11, Hicks Quantum field theory on anti-de Sitter space-time
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Sep 21 Thu Sam Dolan (Sheffield) Cosmology, Relativity and Gravitation
14:00 J11, Hicks Geometrical optics and spin-helicity effects.
 
  Abstract:
The Belem group have recently shown a "spin-helicity effect" in the absorption of circularly-polarized electromagnetic & gravitational waves by a Kerr black hole, in which the counter-rotating helicity is more absorbed than the co-rotating helicity. The difference in the absorption cross sections scales with the inverse wavelength, so the helicity-dependence disappears in the zero-wavelength limit. The aim of this talk is to extend geometricaloptics beyond leading order to understand this effect.
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Sep 21 Thu Christopher Fewster (University of York) Cosmology, Relativity and Gravitation
15:00 J11, Hicks Preferred states in quantum field theories, ancient and modern
 
  Abstract:
The vacuum state of Minkowski space quantum field theory is distinguished as a state of maximal symmetry. General curved spacetimes have no nontrivial symmetry and therefore lack an obvious candidate vacuum state. Nonetheless, one might wonder whether there is still a way of selecting a preferred state and there have been many attempts in that direction. I will discuss various aspects of this issue, describing a general model-independent no-go theorem that excludes the existence of a local and covariant choice of preferred state. I will also discuss recently-introduced class of "SJ states" and its extensions.
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Sep 27 Wed Matthew Allcock/Mihai Barbulescu (Sheffield) Applied Mathematics Colloquium
14:00 Hicks, LT 9 Magneto-acoustic waves in asymmetric solar waveguides: magneto-seismology and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability
 
  Abstract:
Matthew Allcock's abstract - Our Sun is a restless plasma with a strong and evolving magnetic field, making magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) an essential tool to describe its behaviour. The Sun’s atmosphere, where magnetic forces dominate, is permeated by MHD waves that can be used as an indirect method for diagnosing difficult-to-measure parameters of the solar plasma. This technique is known as solar magneto-seismology. In this talk, we will introduce a novel equilibrium structure consisting of two parallel discontinuities with a uniform magnetic field in the central region. We perturb the system and illustrate the eigenmodes using 3D animations to demonstrate the change in character of symmetric MHD wave modes when the system is asymmetric. We derive two methods that use this asymmetry to estimate the strength of the background magnetic field. This advances the field of solar magneto-seismology in locally asymmetric structures in the solar atmosphere.

Mihai Barbulescu's abstract - Solar plasma is highly dynamic and subject to various kinetic and magnetic forces. Many of these forces create bulk flows which need to be included in analytical models, especially when studying time dependent phenomena. Building up from the previous talk, we study the effects that a steady flow has on wave propagation in an asymmetric waveguide, and on its stability. When flow speeds are high enough, they force perturbations of the waveguide to steepen, and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) occurs. We calculate the critical values required by the KHI under different parameter regimes and discuss how these results may change how we view various solar phenomena.
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Sep 28 Thu Steven Julious and Jo Rothwell (Sheffield) RSS Seminar Series
16:00 Hicks LT2 Quantifying Effect Sizes in Clinical Trials
 
  Abstract:
Central to the validity of a RCT is a calculation of the number of participants required (the sample size) which provides reassurance that the trial will be informative. Conventionally, this is usually based upon a difference in the primary outcome (target difference) between groups that is desired to be detectable; the corresponding number of participants needed to be recruited is then calculated. From both a scientific and ethical standpoint, selecting an appropriate target difference is very important. However it has been neglected until relatively recently. A variety of approaches have been proposed and addressed by a large recent review. However there is need for greater guidance to aid researchers and funders. The DELTA2 study was commissioned by two UK academic trial funders (MRC and NIHR) to improve guidance in this area. However the project has engaged stakeholders from all sectors and the recommendations applicable to all clinical trials whether they be academic or industry sponsored. This session will present findings from this project and related work as part of a process of engagement with stakeholders prior to finalizing the guidance on specifying the target difference in a randomized trial sample size calculation.
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Oct 2 Mon Etienne Farcot (Nottingham) Mathematical Biology Seminar Series
14:00 Alfred Denny Conference Room Examples of Boolean modelling in plant development
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Oct 3 Tue Beth Romano (Cambridge) Number Theory seminar
13:00 J11 On the arithmetic of simple singularities of type E
 
  Abstract:
Given a simply laced Dynkin diagram, one can use Vinberg theory of graded Lie algebras to construct a family of algebraic curves. In the case when the diagram is of type $E_7$ or $E_8$, Jack Thorne and I have used the relationship between these families of curves and their associated Vinberg representations to gain information about integral points on the curves. In my talk, I’ll focus on the role Lie theory plays in the construction of the curves and in our proofs.
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Oct 3 Tue Dave Applebaum (TUOS)
15:00 Hicks, LT 6 Introduction to reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces
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Oct 4 Wed Chris Nelson (University of Sheffield) SP2RC Discussion & Book Group
13:00 Hicks LT10 An introduction to data analysis using SDO
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Oct 4 Wed Anna Felikson (University of Durham) Pure Maths Colloquium
14:00 J11 Quiver mutations, reflection groups and curves on punctured disc
 
  Abstract:

Mutations of quivers were introduced by Fomin and Zelevinsky in 2002 in the context of cluster algebras. For some classes of quivers, mutations can be realised using geometric or combinatorial models. We will discuss a construction of a geometric model for all acyclic quivers. The construction is based on the geometry of reflection groups acting in quadratic spaces. As an application, we show an easy and explicit way to characterise real Schur roots (i.e. dimension vectors of indecomposable rigid representations of Q over the path algebra kQ), which proves a recent conjecture of K.-H. Lee and K. Lee for a large class of acyclic quivers.

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Oct 4 Wed Zijing Ding (Bristol) Applied Mathematics Colloquium
14:00 Hicks, LT 9 Thin liquid film flowing down a vertical fibre
 
  Abstract:
We consider the motion of a gravity-driven flow coating a vertical fibre rotating about its axis. This flow exhibits rich dynamics including the formation of droplets, or beads, driven by a Rayleigh-Plateau mechanism modified by the presence of gravity and rotation. We derived an evolution equation for the film thickness using a long-wave approximation. We focus on the effect of rotation on the linear stability, absolute-convective instabilities (CI/AI), nonlinear evolution and the travelling solutions. The results of the linear stability analysis show that the effect of rotating is destabilizing. A spatial-temporal stability analysis is performed to investigate the convective-absolute instability characteristics of the problem. We also perform a numerical simulation on the nonlinear evolution of the film to examine the transition from CI to AI regime. It has been shown that the effect of rotation enhances the absolute instability and promotes the breakup of the film into smaller droplets. The travelling wave solutions of the evolution equation yield information regarding the shape of the interface and propagation speed of the disturbance
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Oct 4 Wed Eoin Murphy ShEAF: postgraduate pure maths seminar
16:00 Hicks Room J11 t = 1 Limits of Hall Algebras and Quantum Groups
 
  Abstract:
In this talk I hope to discuss how two isomorphic algebras degenerate on setting a parameter t=1. One of these is the quantum group Q associated to a simple Lie algebra. The other is a Hall algebra H of a certain category of complexes of quiver representations. The interesting thing is that for either algebra there are in fact different "ways to set t=1" resulting in different degenerate algebras. On the one hand one gets the universal enveloping algebra of a Lie algebra, on the other a Poisson algebra of functions on a Poisson-Lie group. We describe the t=1 theory of H and explain how it is related to that of Q. The story involves work for my PhD thesis and builds on results due to Ringel, Bridgeland, Deng, Chen and others.
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Oct 5 Thu Simon Willerton (Sheffield) Topology seminar
16:00 J11 The magnitude of odd balls
 
  Abstract:
Tom Leinster introduced the magnitude of finite metric spaces by formal analogy with his notion of Euler characteristic of finite categories. This can be thought of an 'effective number of points' n the metric space. It soon became clear that this notion of magnitude could
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Oct 6 Fri Neil Strickland Chromatic homotopy theory reading seminar
13:00 J11 An introduction to chromatic homotopy theory
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Oct 10 Tue Daniel Loughran (Manchester) Number Theory seminar
13:00 J11 Determinants as sums of two squares
 
  Abstract:
A classical theorem due independently to Landau and Ramanujan gives an asymptotic formula for the number of integers which can be written as a sum of two squares. We prove an analogous result for the determinant of a matrix using the spectral theory of automorphic forms. This is a special case of a more general result on a problem of Serre concerning specialisations of Brauer group elements on semisimple algebraic groups. This is joint work with Sho Tanimoto and Ramin Takloo-Bighash.
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Oct 11 Wed Susan Sierra (University of Edinburgh) Pure Maths Colloquium
14:00 J11 Noncommutative birational geometry
 
  Abstract:

One of the motivating problems in ring theory in the past twenty-five years has been the classification of noncommutative projective surfaces: that is, classifying all noetherian N-graded rings of cubic growth. In particular, one may ask: Fix a division ring D. What are the N-graded rings as above that are contained in the polynomial extension D[t] and have the same (graded) division ring of fractions? This is known as "classifying noncommutative surfaces birational to D''.

This question is particularly interesting where D is the division ring which comes from the famous Sklyanin algebra: a graded ring which behaves like the coordinate ring of a noncommutative version of the projective plane. Remarkably, although this situation is highly noncommutative, many of the famous theorems of (commutative) algebraic geometry of surfaces have very strong analogues. We describe how to do birational geometry in this noncommutative context, including noncommutative versions of blowing up a point and contracting a curve. However, these techniques, when applied to noncommutative rings, have applications which are extremely counterintuitive when compared with the commutative context.

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Oct 11 Wed Ed Ryan (Lancaster) Uncertainty Quantification study group
14:00 Hicks LT A Calibrating a global atmospheric chemistry transport model using a Gaussian process emulator and measurements of surface ozone and surface CO
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Oct 11 Wed Jordan Williamson (Sheffield) ShEAF: postgraduate pure maths seminar
16:00 J11 Hicks Morita Theory in Stable Homotopy Theory
 
  Abstract:
Morita theory was developed in the 1950s as a tool for studying rings by studying their categories of modules. Since then, reincarnations of Morita theory for abelian categories, derived categories and stable model categories have been developed. We will outline the classical version of Morita theory, the extension to the world of stable homotopy theory, and then use this extension to show how this result can be powerful in the search for algebraic models of spectra.
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Oct 12 Thu Dino Sejdinovic (Oxford) Statistics Seminar
14:00 LT 9 Approximate Kernel Embeddings and Symmetric Noise Invariance
 
  Abstract:
Kernel embeddings of distributions and the Maximum Mean Discrepancy (MMD), the resulting distance between distributions, are useful tools for fully nonparametric hypothesis testing and for learning on distributional inputs. I will give an overview of this framework and present some of the applications of the approximate kernel embeddings to Bayesian computation. Further, I will discuss a recent modification of MMD which aims to encode invariance to additive symmetric noise and leads to learning on distributions robust to the distributional covariate shift, e.g. where measurement noise on the training data differs from that on the testing data. https://arxiv.org/abs/1703.07596
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Oct 12 Thu Akos Matszangosz Topology seminar
16:00 J11 Real enumerative geometry and equivariant cohomology: Borel-Haefliger type theorems
 
  Abstract:
Enumerative geometry studies questions of the type: how many geometric objects satisfy a prescribed set of (generic) conditions? Over the complex field the answer is a single number. However, over R the answer depends on the configuration. A theorem of Borel and Haefliger states that mod 2 the answer is the same. Thom realized, that for a generic a) smooth, b) holomorphic map f, the cohomology class [Si(f)] of the singular points of f of a given type can be expressed as a universal polynomial evaluated at the characteristic classes of the map. The second theorem of Borel and Haefliger states that mod 2, the universal polynomial is the same in the smooth and holomorphic case. In this talk I plan to discuss these questions from the point of view of equivariant topology. The spaces satisfying the condition of the Borel-Haefliger theorem are part of a class of Z2-spaces called conjugation spaces introduced by Hausmann, Holm and Puppe. Analogously we introduce a class of U(1)-spaces which we call circle spaces in an attempt to say something more than parity about these questions. This is joint work with László Fehér.
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Oct 13 Fri Dr Jiajia Liu (University of Sheffield) SP2RC seminar
13:00 LT 11 Solar jets
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Oct 13 Fri Daniel Graves Chromatic homotopy theory reading seminar
14:00 J11 Formal group laws and Lazard's theorem
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Oct 17 Tue Lassina Dembele (King's College London) Number Theory seminar
13:00 J11 On the compatibility between base change and Hecke action
 
  Abstract:
Let $F/E$ be a Galois extension of totally real number fields. In this talk, we will discuss the action of $Gal(F/E)$ on Hecke orbits of automorphic forms on $GL_2$. This reveals some compatibility between base change and Hecke action, which has several implications for Langlands functoriality.
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Oct 17 Tue Alexander Vishik (Nottingham) Algebra / Algebraic Geometry seminar
14:00 J11 Subtle Stiefel-Whitney classes
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Oct 17 Tue Andrew Morozov (Leicester) Mathematical Biology Seminar Series
15:00 Hicks LT 10 Revisiting the concept of evolutionary fitness in systems with inheritance.
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Oct 18 Wed Hovhannes Khudaverdian (University of Manchester) Pure Maths Colloquium
14:00 J11 Thick morphisms and Koszul brackets
 
  Abstract:

We show an application of the new notion of a thick morphism of (super)manifolds.

For an arbitrary manifold $M$, consider the supermanifolds $\Pi TM$ and $\Pi T^*M$, where $\Pi$ is the parity reversion functor. The space $\Pi TM$ has an odd vector field that can be identified with the canonical de Rham differential $d$; functions on it can be identified with differential forms on $M$. The space $\Pi T^*M$ has an odd Poisson bracket $[ - , - ]$; functions on it can be identified with multivector fields on $M$ and the bracket is the canonical Schouten bracket. An arbitrary even function $P$ which obeys the master-equation $[P,P]=0$ defines an even homotopy Poisson structure on the manifold $M$ and an odd homotopy Poisson structure (the "higher Koszul brackets") on differential forms on $M$.

In the case when the function $P$ is quadratic on fibres, then the homotopy Poisson structure on $M$ and the higher Koszul bracket on differential forms are ordinary even and odd Poisson structures. It is a classical fact that there is a linear map of differential forms endowed with the Koszul bracket to multivector fields endowed with the canonical odd Schouten bracket $[ -, - ]$. In the general case, when we have a homotopy Poisson structure on $M$, this linear map does not exist. We show how to construct a non-linear transformation from differential forms endowed with the higher Koszul brackets to multivector fields with the canonical Schouten bracket. This is done as a non-linear pullback with respect to some thick morphism of supermanifolds, a notion recently introduced.

(The talk is based on the work with Ted Voronov.)

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Oct 18 Wed Thomas Prince (Imperial) Algebra / Algebraic Geometry seminar
15:00 J11 From period integrals to toric degenerations of Fano manifolds
 
  Abstract:
Given a Fano manifold we will consider two ways of attaching a (usually infinite) collection of polytopes, and a certain combinatorial transformation relating them, to it. The first is via Mirror Symmetry, following a proposal of Coates-Corti-Kasprzyk-Galkin-Golyshev. The second is via symplectic topology, and comes from considering degenerating Lagrangian torus fibrations. We then relate these two collections using the Gross--Siebert program. I will also comment on the situation in higher dimensions, noting particularly that by 'inverting' the second method (degenerating Lagrangian fibrations) we can produce topological constructions of Fano threefolds.
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Oct 18 Wed Angelo Rendina (Sheffield) ShEAF: postgraduate pure maths seminar
16:00 J11 Hicks Ramanujan sums, the Casimir effect and the Riemann zeta function
 
  Abstract:
In 1913 Ramanujan claimed in a letter to Hardy that $1+2+3+4+...=-1/12$, proving it with elementary methods. We also find examples of such divergent series appearing in some quantum physics phenomena, e.g. the Casimir effect, where a suitable renormalization allows to deal with converge problems; again, we find the same value of $-1/12$. The theory of analytic functions and meromorphic continuation makes sense of this absurd value: in particular, we will see how to extend the generalized harmonic series to the whole complex plane and find its functional equation.
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Oct 19 Thu Mauricio Alvarez (Sheffield) Statistics Seminar
14:00
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Oct 19 Thu Xue-Mei Li (Imperial) Probability
14:00 LT3 Brownian motions, Brownian Bridges and all that…
 
  Abstract:
BMs are well understood, Brownian bridges are conditioned Brownian motions and are well understood as such. On an Euclidean space, each induces a Gaussian measures on the space of paths. They are the Wiener measures. These measures can be used to construct Dirichlet forms and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes. Brownian bridges play the role of a delta measure and can be used for heat kernel estimates. In this talk we explore Brownian bridges, semi-classical bridges and even `generalized Brownian bridges’ for general elliptic differential operators.
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Oct 20 Fri Hope Thackray (Sheffield) SP2RC seminar
13:00 LT11 Ring Diagram Analysis
 
  Abstract:
In helioseismology, acoustic waves within the Sun are studied in order to derive sub-surface properties. One such helioseismological technique is known as Ring Diagram Analysis, first described in Hill (1988). Spectral data of Doppler shifted flows at the surface of the Sun can be used to deduce flow estimates beneath. Here, I illustrate the analysis using Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) data.
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Oct 20 Fri Igor Sikora Chromatic homotopy theory reading seminar
14:00 J11 Complex oriented cohomology theories
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Oct 24 Tue Henri Johnston (Exeter) Number Theory seminar
13:00 J11 The p-adic Stark conjecture at s=1 and applications
 
  Abstract:
Let E/F be a finite Galois extension of totally real number fields and let p be a prime. The `p-adic Stark conjecture at s=1' relates the leading terms at s=1 of p-adic Artin L-functions to those of the complex Artin L-functions attached to E/F. When E=F this is equivalent to Leopoldt’s conjecture for E at p and the ‘p-adic class number formula’ of Colmez. In this talk we discuss the p-adic Stark conjecture at s=1 and applications to certain cases of the equivariant Tamagawa number conjecture (ETNC). This is joint work with Andreas Nickel.
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Oct 24 Tue Pierrick Bousseau (Imperial) Algebra / Algebraic Geometry seminar
14:00 J11 Quantum mirrors of log Calabi-Yau surfaces
 
  Abstract:
I will start describing the Gross-Hacking-Keel realization of mirror symmetry for log Calabi-Yau surfaces: the mirror variety is constructed by gluing elementary pieces together according to some gluing functions determined by counting rational curves in the original variety. I will then explain how to construct non-commutative deformations of these mirrors by including contributions of counts of higher genus curves in the original variety.
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Oct 25 Wed Ivan Cheltsov (University of Edinburgh) Pure Maths Colloquium
14:00 J11 Finite collineation groups and birational geometry
 
  Abstract:
Finite groups acting linearly on complex projective spaces have been studies by many people including Blichfeldt, Brauer, Lindsey, Wales, Collins, Thompson and Robinson. In dimension one (projective line) they had been classified in antiquity. Aside from cyclic and dyhedral groups, there are just three such groups, which are the groups of symmetries of Platonic solids. In higher dimensions, the classification is much more complicated. Finite subgroups of the projective transformations of the plane have been classified by Blichfeldt in 1917. He also classified finite subgroups of projective transformations of the three-dimensional space. In my talk I will describe Blichfeldt's classification and explain how to use it to describe equivariant birational geometry of the projective plane and three-dimensional space.
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Oct 25 Wed James Mather (Sheffield) Applied Mathematics Colloquium
14:00 Hicks, LT 9 Flow Instabilities in Partially Ionised Plasmas: Dissipative and Resonant Instabilities
 
  Abstract:
The solar atmosphere is a vastly complex and dynamic area, containing many different magnetic structures. The temperature can vary from approximately 4500 K at the temperature minimum to over 10 MK in parts of the solar corona. This temperature stratification affects how ionised the solar plasma is at different layers. Prominences are largely characterised as chromospheric material, at approximately 10000 K, suspended within the coronal plasma and, therefore, may not be fully ionised. They are also very dynamic and may exhibit bulk flows, with observations showing the presence of numerous instabilities. In this talk we firstly briefly introduce the fully ionised magnetic plasma slab moving under. Next, we investigate a plasma slab that has a uniform background bulk flow in the single fluid approximation, where partial ionisation is considered in Cowling’s resistive term in the induction equation, modelling a prominence surrounded by a viscous corona. We study the dissipative instability that can occur at flow speeds that match the internal tube/slow speed. Secondly, we set up a completely two fluid magnetic slab (ions and neutrals) moving under a bulk flow and investigate, in both the compressible and incompressible cases, a quasi-resonant instability that occurs between a new mode, that appears due to neutral molecules, which is always KHI unstable for any shear in flow and the normal magneto-acoustic modes of a slab moving under a uniform bulk flow.
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Oct 25 Wed Giovanni Marchetti (Sheffield) ShEAF: postgraduate pure maths seminar
16:00 J11 Hicks Perverse dimensions
 
  Abstract:
Exactly 100 years ago, Felix Hausdorff came up with the original idea that some geometrical objects might have non-integer dimension. However, very few steps have been made in homological algebra to pursue this idea. We discuss how the formalism of Bridgeland's stability can be exploited to build homology objects indexed by sets more general than the integers. Finally, we borrow an example from the theory of perverse sheaves to show that dimensions could be even worse behaved: they could be uncomparable.
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Oct 26 Thu Sam Cohen (Oxford) Probability
14:00 LT 3 Statistical Uncertainty and nonlinear expectations
 
  Abstract:
In stochastic decision problems, one often wants to estimate the underlying probability measure statistically, and then to use this estimate as a basis for decisions. We shall consider how the uncertainty in this estimation can be explicitly and consistently incorporated in the valuation of decisions, using the theory of nonlinear expectations.
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Oct 26 Thu Scott Balchin (Sheffield) Topology seminar
16:00 J11 Lifting cyclic model structures to the category of groupoids
 
  Abstract:
Abstract: We consider the problem of lifting certain Quillen model structures on the category of cyclic sets to the category of groupoids, echoing the construction of the Thomason model structure on Cat. We prove that this model structure only captures the theory of homotopy 1-types, and as a consequence, that SO(2)-equivariant homotopy 1-types cannot be encoded in a discrete manner. We will fully describe all of the components required for this model structure, in particular, assuming no familiarity with the model structures on cyclic sets or the Thomason model structure on Cat. This work is joint with Richard Garner.
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Oct 27 Fri Akos Matszangosz Chromatic homotopy theory reading seminar
13:00 J11 Complex bordism - Part 1
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Oct 30 Mon Mukul Tewary (Toronto) Mathematical Biology Seminar Series
14:00 Hicks LT 9 In vitro models of early developmental morphogenesis using human pluripotent stem cells
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Oct 31 Tue TBA Number Theory seminar
13:00 J11
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Nov 1 Wed Brita Nucinkis (University of London - Royal Holloway) Pure Maths Colloquium
14:00 J11
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Nov 1 Wed Malte Heuer (Sheffield) ShEAF: postgraduate pure maths seminar
16:00 J11 Hicks TBA
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Nov 2 Thu Julian Holstein (Lancaster) Topology seminar
16:00 J11 Maurer-Cartan elements and infinity local systems
 
  Abstract:
Maurer-Cartan elements for differential graded Lie algebras or associative algebras play an important role in several branches of mathematics, in particular for classifying deformations . There are different sensible notions of equivalence for Maurer-Cartan elements, and while they agree in the nilpotent case, the general theory is not yet well-understood. This talk will compare gauge equivalence and different notions of homotopy equivalence for Maurer-Cartan elements of a dg-algebra. As an application we extend the study of cohesive modules introduced by Block, and find a new algebraic characterisation of infinity local systems on a topological space. This is joint work with Joe Chuang and Andrey Lazarev.
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Nov 3 Fri Akos Matszangosz Chromatic homotopy theory reading seminar
14:00 J11 Complex bordism - Part 2
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Nov 7 Tue Soheyla Feyzbakhsh (Edinburgh) Algebra / Algebraic Geometry seminar
14:00 J11 TBA
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Nov 9 Thu Arthur Gretton (UCL) Statistics Seminar
14:00
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Nov 10 Fri Luca Pol Chromatic homotopy theory reading seminar
13:00 J11 The Adams spectral sequence
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Nov 13 Mon Natalia Petrovskaya (Birmingham) Mathematical Biology Seminar Series
14:00 Alfred Denny Conference Room Spatial patterns arising in a model of biological invasion with short-distance and long-distance dispersal.
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Nov 15 Wed Magdalini Flari (Sheffield) Differential geometry seminar
14:00 F38 TBA (Despite the day and time, this is not the Pure Maths Colloquium.)
 
  Abstract:
TBA
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Nov 15 Wed Rebecca Hoyle (Southampton) Applied Mathematics Colloquium
14:00 Hicks, LT 9
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Nov 16 Thu Timothy Waite (Manchester) Statistics Seminar
14:00
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Nov 17 Fri Jordan Williamson Chromatic homotopy theory reading seminar
14:00 J11 Quillen's theorem
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Nov 21 Tue Fredrik Stromberg (Nottingham) Number Theory seminar
13:00 J11 TBA
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Nov 21 Tue Davide Masoero (Lisbon) Algebra / Algebraic Geometry seminar
14:00 J11 TBA
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Nov 22 Wed Shaun Stevens (University of East Anglia) Pure Maths Colloquium
14:00 J11
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Nov 22 Wed Jonathan Sherratt (Heriot-Watt) Applied Mathematics Colloquium
14:00 Hicks, LT 9 Using Mathematics to Infer the Historical Origin of Vegetation Patterns in Semi-Deserts
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Nov 23 Thu Andrew Bell (Sheffield) RSS Seminar Series
16:30 Hicks LT9 Formula for success: multilevel modelling of Formula One driver and constructer performance
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Nov 24 Fri Nicola Bellumat Chromatic homotopy theory reading seminar
14:00 J11 Formal groups and heights
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Nov 27 Mon Philip Greulich (Southampton) Mathematical Biology Seminar Series
14:00 Alfred Denny Conference Room
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Nov 28 Tue Carl Wang-Erickson (Imperial) Number Theory seminar
13:00 J11 TBA
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Nov 28 Tue Emilie Dufresne (Nottingham) Algebra / Algebraic Geometry seminar
14:00 J11 TBA
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Nov 29 Wed Anna Barbieri (Sheffield) Pure Maths Colloquium
14:00 J11
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Nov 29 Wed Ricardo Garcia-Mayoral (Cambridge) Applied Mathematics Colloquium
14:00 Hicks, LT 9
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Dec 1 Fri Dimitar Kodjabachev Chromatic homotopy theory reading seminar
14:00 J11 The stratification of M_FG
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Dec 5 Tue Ariel Weiss (Sheffield) Number Theory seminar
13:00 J11 TBA
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Dec 6 Wed Kenta Ishimoto (Oxfod) Applied Mathematics Colloquium
14:00 Hicks, LT 9
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Dec 7 Thu Maria Kalli (Kent) Statistics Seminar
14:00
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Dec 8 Fri Luca Pol Chromatic homotopy theory reading seminar
14:00 J11 The classification of formal groups
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Dec 12 Tue David Spencer (Sheffield) Number Theory seminar
13:00 J11 TBA
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Dec 12 Tue Marta Mazzocco (Loughborough) Algebra / Algebraic Geometry seminar
14:00 J11 TBA
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Dec 13 Wed Marco Schlichting (University of Warwick) Pure Maths Colloquium
14:00 J11
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Dec 15 Fri Scott Balchin Chromatic homotopy theory reading seminar
14:00 J11 Flat modules over M_FG
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